Imagine having all of your memories vanish one by one, until you are essentially much like a over-sized newborn baby. Alzheimer’s disease is a disease that affects a persons memory, and can be devastating to the diagnosed loved-one’s family. This article will give you and your family some tips for coping with the emotional stress involved with this disease.

Exercise your brain. Using your memory and other thought provoking functions of your brain daily, will help keep your mind and your memory sharp. Do puzzles, drive a different way to work and memorize something every day. You will see an improvement quickly and less of a decline as time moves on.

Help protect your memory for years to come by making sure you are getting plenty of vitamin B-12 in your diet. Studies have linked low levels of B-12 to dementia and poor cognitive function. Food sources rich in B-12 include liver, eggs, fish, poultry, meat and milk products. If you don’t eat a lot of meat, you may need to take a daily B-12 supplement to help prevent deficiency.

Write sticky notes to help yourself remember to complete tasks. Stick them to spots that you look at frequently during the day, for example on the edge of your computer monitor or on your restroom mirror. Sticky notes are great tools to help you remember things.

Avoid smoking cigarettes to keep your memory from being negatively affected. Studies have shown that the memory of smokers suffers more than compared to non-smokers. You probably didn’t need yet another reason to quit, but maybe this will be the one that lets you finally put down that pack.

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In order to improve your memory, be sure that you exercise on a regular basis. It is proven that exercise makes a person more alert, which in turn, helps you to absorb and keep information in the mind. Also, when your mind is alert, it is easier for it to take mental pictures.

The easiest way to improve your memory is to get a good night’s sleep! Sometimes our busy schedules make it seem like cutting out a few hours of sleep is the only way to be productive, but your brain needs rest to function at its best. Sleeping is also when your brain processes and stores your memories from that day.

Try to avoid alcohol if you would like to improve your memory. It has been scientifically proven that alcohol kills the cells from the part of the brain that absorbs information. However, most research seems to prove that having one or two glasses of wine a day is okay for the memory.

Exercise your body – exercise your brain. By exercising regularly, you increase the amount of oxygen that gets to your brain, and reduce the risk of illnesses that can contribute to memory loss, such as heart disease and diabetes. Exercise can also increase the effects of certain chemicals that help the brain to function at its best.

When trying to commit information into your long-term memory, make sure you are in a location with zero distractions. It takes real attention to move information from short-term to long-term memory, and a distracting environment can make the task nearly impossible. Steer clear of areas where there are televisions, radios, crowds or lots of visual stimuli.

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To help yourself remember something jot down some notes, say them aloud and keep your notes organized. When you involve different functions of your body such as writing and talking to remember something, those physical activities will help your brain recall more effectively. In addition, the notes serve as a visual memory aid.

Make your memorization easier by using mnemonic devices. The easiest one is to associate a visual image with the word or name you need to remember. Life like, vivid images linked to hard to memorize or understand concepts can help to speed up the learning process significantly. Think of images from your everyday life to make the process easier and faster.

When you are trying to commit something to memory, it’s important to stay in the current moment as much as you possibly can. Try to avoid the urge to focus on the past or the future as you are learning. Make every effort to focus your attention on the material at hand, and you will retain it better.

Lately, have you been having trouble with your memory? Maybe this is because you are having sleeping problems. Surprisingly, poor sleep can hurt your memory processes. If you are having trouble going to sleep at night or if you are sleep-deprived for any other reason, it could be causing your lapse in memory. If sleeping continues to be a problem consult your physician for help in alleviating this situation.

Try studying in different locations and at different times of the day. This will help you determine what works best for you, and also make sure that you can recall information in different settings. Likely you will not be taking an exam in conditions similar to the ones you studied for it in.

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When trying to memorize a large bit of information or a number which is long, you can retain the information by learning it in chunks. Take the information and group it into small segments that you are able to easily retain. When you have the small segments memorized, add the groups together two at a time until you have remembered it all.

One of the most effective and easiest ways to remember material is by repeating it until you can easily recall it. If the information you need to remember is written down, just read it over and over until it all sinks in. It also helps to recite the information just before bed.

As discussed in the beginning of this article, Alzheimer’s disease is a debilitating disease that affects your memory. Watching your mother or father’s memory, deteriorate in-front of your eyes, can be one of the most painful experiences that life has to offer. Apply the advice from this article to help you and your family cope with this devastating disease.